Nabil Gholam

Nabil Gholam Architecture

Architect
Speaker in event(s): Design Oriented Development
Born in Beirut in 1962, Gholam studied architecture in Paris and worked with Ricardo Bofill until 1994, when he returned to Lebanon and founded NGAP. Since then he has built prominent projects mainly in Lebanon and the Arab countries. In 1996 he married Ana Corbero, the Catalan-born visual artist.
 
Nabil Gholam Architecture & Planning (NGAP) is one of the few widely recognized young architecture firms in the Middle East region. Among other distinctions, NGAP won the all-categories Best of Show Award of the MIPIM/Architectural Review Future Projects Awards for the year 2006, for the urban project of Doha Gardens in Khobar, Saudi Arabia.
 
In Beirut, his buildings and approved projects include Platinum Tower in the Beirut Marina (with Ricardo Bofill), parts of the Saifi Village and Beirut Gate developments adjacent to Martyrs' Square, the master plan for the redevelopment of the Wadi Abu Jamil neighborhood, several other projects in the Solidere area and the Irani-Oxy Engineering Complex of the American University of Beirut.

Nabil Gholam Architecture

Nabil Gholam Architecture is a people-focused architectural and planning practice where each project is important for not what can be built but the lives that it facilities. Being aware of the role as catalysts, the design process prioritizes the needs of the clients while integrating the broader social and environmental impact of the project today and tomorrow. Throughout the phases of design, the firm explores the physical and intangible qualities of each location, balanced with technique, aesthetics and community, realizing distinctive and timeless environments. Optimizing living, engendering character and organizing ecological and functional efficiencies are qualities valued in their architecture and planning practice. Throughout their work of the past, the office also has learned that the subtle qualities of each project, sometimes physical, sometimes symbolic, most often complex reflective combinations of both require what can be described as a humanistic approach. Their designs offer buildings as simple and condensed distillations of the realities of the building program, site and inhabitants. The only effort is to improve the quality of people's lives by being aware of how and where they live in the dimensions of time and space.
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